Cat Lady Clothes Gone Modern Thanks To Cat Fashionista Clothing Line!

For us crazy cat ladies–and gents!–we are purrfectly proud to wear our love for cats right on our sleeves…literally! How many cat lady or cat man clothes do you have in your wardrobe right now? I know for myself I could easily say I have 10 shirts with some sort of cat motif to them. Because cat lady clothes speak straight to my heart!

Well, now we’re in luck if we’re trying to show our love for cats in ultimate style! Cat Fashionista is the “curator of cat couture” and they’re here to save us from the despair of frumpy cat lady clothes.

Read about their story below from their website, catfashionista.com:

Cat Fashionista is an online boutique and curator of cat couture for the modern cat lady who isn’t ashamed to wear that love on her vogue sleeve.

…And it all started with a cat named Kerpal.

Backing up about 15 years ago to a small apartment in Englewood, NJ, a stylish couple faced the dilemma many cat lovers face: finding cat furniture their feline loved and didn’t look hideous or waste unnecessary space. Unable to get their paws on such an anomaly, this couple decided to build it themselves. Thus, our sister store, The Refined Feline, was born. Hurray cat furniture with freaking style!

Now, from home to clothing, the makers of The Refined Feline are tackling another dilemma for the fashion-forward cat lover…

…Modern cat lady apparel and accessories for the chic and fiercely fashionable.

These women (that includes you, little cat lover) have been waiting for someone to get their act together and realize that cat lady fashion does not have to be an eyesore. That’s where Cat Fashionista strolls in.

We got you, girl!

We’re excited for you to sort through our furrocious collection and express your inner cat lady while looking smart, refined, and feline fierce.

Can you say #catfashionista?

Okay, so now on to the best part — all the PURRFECT cat lady clothes!! Tops, bottoms, dresses, jackets, pajamas, accessories, oh my!

What crazy cat lady doesn’t have a cat lady dress? Now you can show your love for cats in lovely prints that flow and make you look like a million bucks. Check out just a handful of Cat Fashionista’s gorgeous dresses below–but don’t forget to view them all on their site!

Want to be the cat’s pajamas? Now you can with these purrfect designs! Those cat naps have never felt as good as they did before these modern cat lady pj’s came along!

And you’re not a crazy cat lady without a cat lady blouse, right? Cat Fashionista has you covered with the latest and greatest in stylish cat lady trends:

Did anyone say accessories? Fancy Feast your eyes on these purrfect compliments to any ensemble!

My purrsonal favorite has gotta be this cat lady jacket! 😻😻😻

Curious if you yourself are, in fact, a cat fashionista? Here’s how the brilliant minds at Cat Fashionista see it…

Our friends at Hauspanther shared the news of Cat Fashionista with the world, and boy we’re glad they did! If you didn’t know, Hauspanther is the maker of amazing furniture for cats! Check out our Amazon favorites page with their lovely and functional cat furniture here.

REMEMBER: ADOPT, DON’T SHOP; FOSTERING SAVES LIVES & SPAY AND NEUTER!

Related Story: Cats On Runways – Fashion Friendly Felines Steal The Show!Related Story: Famous Cat Lovers In History

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Keep Pot Away From Your Pets

The post Keep Pot Away From Your Pets by Jackie Brown appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

With pot now legal in many states, the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center has logged a record number of calls regarding pets ingesting marijuana in early 2019 — a whopping 765 percent increase from the same time frame the previous year. The popularity of marijuana “edibles” (food items like brownies or cookies that contain marijuana) could be partly to blame for dog ingestions, but cats are generally more drawn to the plant form. Common signs of marijuana exposure in pets include depression, ataxia (lack of muscle control), agitation, dilated pupils, abnormal heart rate, low body temperature and urinary incontinence. Rarely, seizures or coma may occur.

About the author:

Pet expert Jackie Brown has spent 20 years following her passion for animals as a writer and editor in the pet publishing industry. She is contributing writer for National Geographic’s Complete Guide to Pet Health, Behavior, and Happiness: The Veterinarian’s Approach to At-Home Animal Care (April 2019) and author of the book It’s Raining Cats and Dogs: Making Sense of Animal Phrases (Lumina Press, 2006). Jackie is a regular contributor to pet and veterinary industry media and is the former editor of numerous pet magazines, including Dog World, Natural Dog, Puppies 101, Kittens 101 and the Popular Cats Series. Prior to starting her career in publishing, Jackie spent eight years working in veterinary hospitals where she assisted veterinarians as they treated dogs, cats, rabbits, pocket pets, reptiles, birds and one memorable lion cub. She lives in Southern California with her husband, two sons and miniature poodle Jäger. Reach her at jackiebrownwriter.wordpress.com.

Learn more about safe marijuana product use at catster.com:

The post Keep Pot Away From Your Pets by Jackie Brown appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Books for Cat Lovers

The post Books for Cat Lovers by Annie Butler Shirreffs appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Crazy Cat Lady

Crazy Cat Lady by Agnes Loonstra and Ester Scholten.

Crazy Cat Lady by Agnes Loonstra and Ester Scholten.

The image of the crazy cat lady certainly isn’t what it used to be. Women are embracing and celebrating the label, declaring our love for felines with pride, humor and more than a little sass. Many of us consider the term crazy cat lady a badge of honor. This fun book by Agnes Loonstra and Ester Scholten captures the spirit, coolness and, yes, quirkiness of today’s cat lady. This illustrated celebration of feline fandom features colorful spreads that represent a joyful experience that all cat lovers can identify with. The book is filled with fun mottos (like “cat hair, don’t care”), portraits of crazy cat ladies throughout history, and it even includes a page of cute kitty stickers! Published by Workman Publishing.

Artful Cats

Artful Cats by Mary Savig.

Artful Cats by Mary Savig.

Whether they’re expressive or aloof, affectionate or enigmatic, cats make the best muses. This beautiful book by Mary Savig delves into the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art collections to explore the relationships between artists and their cats, featuring 130 rarely seen photographs, sketches, manuscripts and letters. Jasper Johns, Georgia O’Keeffe and many others are seen showing off their feline friends, who appear as companions, inspirations and often regents of the artists’ homes and studios. The images are culled from the archive’s extensive holdings from the 19th century through today and celebrate our cultural heritage through our love and fascination with cats. Published by Princeton Architectural Press.

About the author:

Annie Butler Shirreffs has worked in the pet industry for 20 years and is currently the senior editor of Catster and Dogster magazines. A cat lover since she was a little girl, she has always had feline friends in her life. She and her husband share their Southern California home with their four cats, Agatha, Alastair, Jack and Mathilda, and an ever-changing clowder of foster kittens, all of whom enjoy being testers for cool, new products.

Find more cat books on catster.com:

The post Books for Cat Lovers by Annie Butler Shirreffs appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Is Your Cat Insecure? 6 Surprising Signs Of Insecurity In Cats

insecure cat

(Picture Credit: Shutterstock)

Cats thrive on feeling safe and secure. When their security disappears, a lot of behavior problems can suddenly appear, seemingly out of nowhere.

You might be surprised to learn that an insecure cat won’t necessarily just always hide in a corner. In fact, some insecure cats become more aggressive to make up for their feelings of inferiority!

The following are some major signs that your cat may be dealing with insecurity issues.

1. Biting, Clawing, And Hissing

With blue eyes, looking at camera

(Picture Credit: brunorbs/Getty Images)

An aggressive cat may not be angry or mean; they may just be insecure.

Some cats overcompensate for insecurity by trying to make themselves the meanest thing in the room. Think of it like a bully who only hurts other people so they won’t be hurt first.

A cat who’s always hissing and scratching at you might actually just be really scared.

2. Peeing All Over the House

urine of a cat or a dog on the floor of a house

(Picture Credit: Cunaplus_M.Faba/Getty Images)

Inappropriate elimination is a classic sign of insecurity in cats. Cats mark their territories with urine as a sign of ownership to other pets in the house and even strays wandering around outside.

If kitty feels insecure about their home, they may start marking everything with urine.

Before deciding the problem is insecurity, take them to the vet to get checked for a urinary tract infection. Sick cats can also develop new habits of peeing in inappropriate places.

3. Hiding Under Your Furniture

This one’s a little more obvious. If kitty is always hiding under your furniture–for example, cowering in a small opening under your couch–you’ve probably got an insecure cat.

Some cats will hide in couches, chairs, or even under blankets when a new person comes to visit.

However, hiding isn’t always a sign of insecurity. Some cats may burrow under your favorite comforter when they just want to sleep undisturbed.

Take note if kitty is only hiding for a peaceful sleep or if they seem to be hiding all the time.

4. Meowing Excessively

Playful kitten playing on the sofa, hiding between cushions and meowing

(Picture Credit: vladans/Getty Images)

Excessive vocalization can be a sign of insecurity or boredom. Cats who are insecure may feel the constant need to get your attention by meowing.

They may experience separation anxiety if you lock them out of your bedroom while you’re sleeping, which can lead to their meowing non-stop at your door.

Watch your cat’s other actions and body posture to determine if they’re insecure or just bored.

5. Tail Down

scared homeless stray cat

Picture Credit: adomer/Getty Images)

If your cat is walking with their tail down, this can be a sign of insecurity. A secure, confident cat will usually walk with their tail held proudly in the air, sticking straight up or slightly curved at the end.

An insecure cat keeps their tail low or tucked between their legs. They may also slink when they walk, keeping their body close to the ground as if they’re trying to hide.

 

6. Dilated Pupils

Scared shy calico tabby maine coon cat under table

(Picture Credit: krblokhin/Getty Images)

Dilated pupils can indicate that something’s wrong. If kitty is insecure or scared, their pupils may dilate so they can observe more from their environment.

In contrast, an angry cat who’s ready to fight will narrow their eyes.

Of course, a change in lighting can also affect your cat’s pupil size, so don’t go by pupil size alone when determining if your cat is insecure.

What Should You Do?

Little boy holds out a stick with feathers on it for a little kitten to play with.

(Picture Credit: Annie Otzen/Getty Images)

If your cat is insecure, try adding some cat trees and towers that kitty can perch on and know are theirs and theirs alone.

Add catnip and cat toys to give your cat a feeling of ownership in certain spaces in the house.

Bonding with your cat can also decrease insecurity, so pick up a cat wand and play with your cat every day.

You can also purchase cat diffusers that emit scents that mimic calming pheromones. These can signal to kitty that everything is safe.

Do you have an insecure cat at home? How do you keep them comfortable? Let us know in the comments below!

The post Is Your Cat Insecure? 6 Surprising Signs Of Insecurity In Cats appeared first on CatTime.

Our Litter Box Setup for Multiple Cats: LR3, Litter Locker, NVR Miss and more!

We recently had our carpets cleaned – and when that happened, I decided that I would move the Litter-Robot 3s from under the stairs in the basement to the unfinished part of the basement.  The carpets were not cleaned because of cat issues.  Since it is not recommended to have Litter-Robots on uneven flooring – like carpeting, I decided it was best to move them to the smooth concrete floor.  Mind you, we never did have a problem with them operating on carpet though!

Litter Box Setup for Multiple Cats LR3 LitterLocker and NVR Miss

Items featured and talked about in this video:


What’s your cat litterbox situation like?  Share in the comments below!

The post Our Litter Box Setup for Multiple Cats: LR3, Litter Locker, NVR Miss and more! appeared first on Floppycats.

Cat Facts: Why Do Cats Go Crazy For Catnip?

Black and white cat laying down on a tree stump with fresh catnip. Taken in natural light.

(Picture Credit: Teresa Lett/Getty Images)

Have you ever seen a cat on catnip? They might go absolutely crazy for the stuff: rolling around in it, running around the house at top speed, drooling, leaping at your hand if they smell it on you at all, or maybe just zoning out completely.

Some cats will even get really aggressive and protective of their catnip toy if they think you might take it away from them.

Catnip drives some cats absolutely crazy–but why? And why do some cats seem to not care about it at all?

What Is Catnip?

Brown and white tabby cat playing with a toy mouse

(Picture Credit: SammiHood/Getty Images)

Catnip is an herb, scientifically called Nepeta Cataria, which is part of the mint family. It has heart-shaped leaves and in the wild, it can grow up to three feet tall.

The plant has small flowers that can bloom in a white, blue, lavender, or pink color. It grows wild in North America but was originally imported here. It’s native to Europe, Asia, and Africa, and it’s fairly easy to grow, yourself.

When the leaves are broken, it releases a chemical called nepetalactone, which cats respond to. If you crush it between your fingers before you rub it on a cat toy or a scratching post, it will have more of an effect because you’re releasing the chemical’s scent.

What Does Catnip Do To Cats?

The scent of catnip has the strongest effect on cats. A recent study by the American Chemical Society found that the nepetalactone in the plant binds to the olfactory receptors in a cat’s nose and triggers a euphoric neurological response.

Experts aren’t sure, however, exactly why the herb triggers such an emotional response. Some scientists think the smell mimics a happy pheromone, and cats’ brains react to it, according to The Humane Society.

Some cats, however, will become aggressive, rather than euphoric, when they smell the herb due to a different reaction to its stimulant effect.

Ingesting catnip also impacts cats, but not as strongly as smelling it. When eaten, it tends to make cats mellower rather than happy.

Why Don’t Some Cats Like Catnip?

Sometimes, one cat will go crazy for catnip while another cat doesn’t care for it at all. That’s because only some cats are actually sensitive to it.

A sensitivity to catnip is inherited, and experts estimate that about 50 to 70 percent of cats will respond to the herb. But the response isn’t limited to domestic felines.

Big wild cats, like lions and tigers, may have this sensitivity, too!

Did You Know That Humans Are Susceptible to Catnip?

Portrait of teenage girl by purple catmint

(Picture Credit: Sasha Bell/Getty Images)

Humans can be emotionally affected by catnip too, although not as strongly as cats are! It’s more of a sedative for people.

When used in tea, it can be kind of like chamomile. The sedating effects can also sometimes help with headaches, nausea, or toothaches.

In a concentrated form, it may repel mosquitoes and other bugs, but it doesn’t last as long as store-bought repellents, and some experts say that it loses its effectiveness when applied to the skin.

Catnip is a safe product for your cat, but if you have a multi-cat household, you should probably introduce each cat to it for the first time individually. This is just in case you have a cat who turns anxious or aggressive instead of happy when exposed to it.

The effects only last about five to 15 minutes. If you find that your cat likes it, you can buy toys and even scratching posts that are infused with it and reward your kitty with an unexpected treat.

Does your cat love catnip? What’s their reaction to this herb? Let us know in the comments below!

The post Cat Facts: Why Do Cats Go Crazy For Catnip? appeared first on CatTime.

Very Smelly Cats Discovered One Cold Night; Now Their Futures Are Merry & Bright!

The winter had settled in as November 2018 ended in Tampa, Florida. Overnight temperatures reached a high in the low 50’s, something Floridians are not fond of. It is during these nights that we like to stay bundled up indoors, watching the winter weather on TV. The holiday festivities and bright lights are beautiful, but you can keep your white wonderland! However, for Chris Poole, or Cat Man Chris as he’s known, he won’t rest easy knowing there are others suffering in the cold. So when he gets texts about sickly and very smelly cats from a local rescue group, he rushes to help. 

Arriving at a nearby apartment complex, he discovered the very, VERY smelly cat, alone and shivering in the cold. 

It was St. Francis Society Animal Rescue that received the initial distress call. A woman living in the complex had seen the cat and called them right away. She had lovingly tried to help, but knew the cat needed more help than she could provide.

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole

By the time Chris had arrived, more obstacles had presented themselves. It was a busy Friday night in the complex apparently, and there were families with children running all around. With his eerily adept eyesight for spotting stray and feral cats, Chris was able to see the cat almost straight away.

Although it may have been the smell emanating from the tiny, pathetic creature.

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole

The poor baby was hiding underneath a car but could easily be smelled from at least 15-feet away. It was covered in filth and what looked like a wide range of health issues. Fortunately, Chris was able to lure the feline out easily with food and scooped him into a carrier.

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole

But then he got another whiff of dirty cat stank coming from the other direction… 

It was then that he realized there were two smelly cats!

The children had gathered near it and were pestering the poor animal. Again, he was able to lure the other cat to him with food and easily grabbed it. He wasn’t about to leave ANY cats in these conditions.

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole

It was very late but Chris was able to get to the veterinarian before they closed for the night. They made sure that the cats had no serious injuries that needed to be addressed immediately. Both cats were given antibiotics and eye medication to help with their crusted eyes. They were experiencing diarrhea, likely making them the smelly cats, but both had great appetites.

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole

There was one male and one female. They named the female, Merry, and the male, Bright. Just like everyone would make sure their futures would be.

Bright, guessed to be around 2 months old, was actually very friendly underneath his pain.

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole ~ Bright

Merry seemed to be more feral then her cohort, but hopefully that would change as she healed.

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole ~ Merry

The duo stayed at the Cat Man Chris / Cole and Marmalade household that night while Chris searched for a fosterer. I can attest that Merry and Bright were still extremely smelly cats, as I couldn’t even go out my back porch during their sleepover! #worthit

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole
Image property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole
Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole

Luckily by the next morning, foster mom Kristen Gilpin from St Francis agreed to take them. 

She scheduled another vet visit for a more thorough examination but there was one thing they needed to do first–bath time. It was overwhelming to try to even breathe near the poor cats. Surprisingly, Kristen was able to bathe Bright with little resistance. You can see in the rescue video (end of article) the white cat emerging from a once dirty crusted boy.

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole
Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole
 

Merry was a bit more difficult to bathe and Chris had to put the camera down to help. But everything worked out in the end and two mostly refreshed felines were snuggled dry. Phew; no more smelly cats!

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole
Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole
 
Sadly after their more thorough vet visit, a plethora of issues were found. 

Scabies, ring worm, upper respiratory infection, Coccidia, tape worms, ear mites, skin abscesses, severe dehydration, severe malnutrition, uveitis (eye infection), fever, intestinal parasites, lethargy, vitamin deficiency, and rectal bleeding … they had also ingested some trash/plastic. Basically, they were a hot mess and wouldn’t have lasted much longer!

Photo property of Cat Man Chris / Chris Poole

The once smelly cats were now clean and fresh, but now the challenge to socialize them had begun. 

And just as easily he gave into a nice warm bath, Bright gave into the indoor life of comfort. There doesn’t seem to be a stray or feral bone in this sweet little man’s spotted body! As you can see in the video he’s good with other cats and super friendly and loves to be petted!

Photo courtesy of Kristen Gilpin / St. Francis Society Animal Rescue ~ Dinner Time at the Gilpin Household!

Bright needs a home and this friendly guy is ready for adoption meow, apply here: http://bit.ly/AdoptBright.

Photo courtesy of Kristen Gilpin / St. Francis Society Animal Rescue

Merry is still unsure about humans, although she accepts their food happily. Kristin and St. Francis have decided that she will ONLY be adopted out with conditions. Whomever was interested would have to be willing to spend a lot of time with her. They need to understand that she is still pretty feral and may never change. 

Photo courtesy of Kristen Gilpin / St. Francis Society Animal Rescue
 
Never fear, if they can’t find the purrfect adopter, Kristen has a barn home lined up for her on a great farm. Win, Win!

Photo courtesy of Kristen Gilpin / St. Francis Society Animal Rescue

Be sure to follow Cat Man Chris on Facebook and YouTube for all his ameowzing rescue stories. I’m sure there will be another smelly cat or two along the way! And for updates on all their life saving work, please follow St. Francis on Facebook too! 

REMEMBER: SPAY/NEUTER, FOSTER, VOLUNTEER, TNR & AS ALWAYS, ADOPT, DON’T SHOP!

 
 
 
 

The post Very Smelly Cats Discovered One Cold Night; Now Their Futures Are Merry & Bright! appeared first on Cole & Marmalade.

How to Keep Cats Off Counters

The post How to Keep Cats Off Counters by Angie Bailey appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Many cats naturally aspire to great heights, which means they sometimes land on counters, a common no-no in households. Those who wish to change this counter-cruising habit often wonder if there’s a tried-and-true solution. There are a few solutions, and the first step is determining the reason why the cat gravitates to the elevated counter space.

Reasons cats like to jump on counters

  • There are desirable items — like food — readily accessible.
  • The counter is a “roadway” to an enticing spot, like a windowsill.
  • There’s fresh, running/dripping water available from a sink.
  • They’re bored.
  • They simply enjoy the elevation.

Ways to keep cats off of counters

Keep the counter space clear of alluring objects. This means placing food in cabinets and re-homing bag clips and other toy-like objects.

Add a tall cat condo or tree to satisfy the cat’s need for height. If possible, place it by a favorite window so kitty has easy, “legal” access to the spot. Or create a new favorite perch by placing a bird feeder outside a window.

A cat next to garlic cloves on a kitchen counter.

A cat next to garlic cloves on a kitchen counter. Photography © kazoka30 | iStock / Getty Images Plus.

Repair leaky faucets, eliminating the draw of running water available by counter access. Perhaps offer the cat a water fountain that provides fresh, moving refreshment — on the floor.

If a chair is helping kitty jump, remove it.

Increase playtime with a cat who’s easily bored. Sometimes counter cruising behavior is a cry for attention, and extra engagement with kitty can satisfy that need and burn extra energy.

Cats don’t like sticky surfaces. Add double-sided tape to one side of cheap, plastic placemats and line the counter space with them. If the cat jumps onto the counter, the discomfort will likely cause her to retreat.

Reward positive behavior. If kitty jumps onto the cat tree instead of the counter, praise her with extra pets and attention or an occasional treat. Animals repeat what benefits them.

Considerations

Don’t punish the cat. He doesn’t make the connection between the punishment and the behavior that resulted in the punishment. Verbal and physical punishment can create fear of the human and even cause the cat to act out.

Some humans rely on a spray bottle as a deterrent to counter cruising. Unfortunately, this method creates a negative association between the human and the spray bottle — not necessarily between the bottle and the behavior. Additionally, kitty may continue with the behavior when the human isn’t around, which doesn’t ultimately change the problem.

There are safety issues associated with jumping onto a counter. Hot surfaces can burn sensitive paws, and dangerous kitchen items like knives pose a threat to curious kitties.

Humans — especially those with compromised or weak immune systems — could be at risk for sanitary issues associated with bacteria from dirty feline paws.

Make sure all family members are onboard with the plan. Consistency is key when it comes to behavior modification.

If all attempts to derail counter cruising don’t seem to work, contact a cat behaviorist for a consultation.

Dr. Marci Koski of Feline Behavior Solutions advises, “When it comes to training cats to curb behaviors, the important thing is to provide an appropriate outlet for the need that drives them to that behavior in the first place. This includes scratching furniture, ambushing people for play and, yes, jumping up on counter tops. Just because you tell them ‘Don’t do that!’ doesn’t mean that the instinctual drive to do a behavior stops — they have a need that must be met in some other way. Cats who like to counter surf want to be up high to see what’s going on, so give them a place to do that — an alternative — that works for both of you. If your cat is doing it because she’s hungry, keeping food off the counters will help, but she’ll still be hungry; feed her more frequent, smaller meals, or use food puzzles to help meet her needs.”

More about the author:

Angie Bailey, an award-winning writer, podcaster, and humorist, is the author of Texts from Mittens and Whiskerslist: The Kitty Classifieds. She’s written cat humor for over a decade, and lives in Minneapolis with her fiancé and two cats — Phoebe, a sassy senior and Janet, a teenage kitty with tons of tortitude.

Learn more about cat behavior on catster.com:

The post How to Keep Cats Off Counters by Angie Bailey appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

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