10 Photos Of Your Cat That We DON’T Want To See

cat posing for a picture taking by the phone

(Picture Credit: beavera/Getty Images)

As cat lovers, our social media pages are filled with our cute, cuddly feline companions from top to bottom. We can’t wait to share every cat picture we can with our friends. We couldn’t possibly deprive them of seeing our fur babies all day, every day.

But there are a few cat photos out there that make us cat lovers shake our heads and ask why anyone thought it would be a good idea to post them. We just want to comment with, “Hey, fellow cat lover, no one wants to see that.”

Here are a few photos that no cat lovers, not even your best social media friends, want to see of your cat.

1. Miserable Cat In Costume

Portrait Of Cat In Santa Claus Costume During Christmas

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

This is a controversial one. After all, if your cat is fine with dressing up, it should be okay to take a cute picture, right?

Well, sure, but most cat lovers can agree that you’re really dressing up the cat for your own benefit, and most cats don’t like it. They may tolerate it, but it’s still mostly for the enjoyment of the owner, not the cat.

Best to just let your cat be naked.

2. Scaredy Cat

Shot of a black cat standing on a sofa

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Intentionally scaring your cat for a photo or video is just kind of cruel. Why intentionally cause fear in a creature who’s supposed to love and trust you completely?

It’s not fair. A cat doesn’t understand a prank like a human does, so keep your cucumbers to yourself and let your cat live without fear as much as possible.

3. Eating Unhealthy People Food

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(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Most people food is not good for cats. Sure, Garfield loves lasagna, but leave the people food to the fictional cats.

Letting your kitty bite into your pizza slice or get a nibble of your sandwich might be tempting, but if you’re going to do it, we don’t need to see it.

It’s cute, but it’s not healthy.

4. Next To Alcohol

black cat and glass of red wine

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

We get it. You’re not drinking alone if your cat is with you.

Excuses for alcoholism aside, keep the alcohol out of reach of your cat.

Maybe your kitty is just next to your wine glass and would never dare to drink it, and that’s fine. But beyond that, your social media friends don’t need to know you’re drinking alone with your cat.

It’s not as funny or endearing as you might think.

5. Stuck Cat

Cat Stuck In Wooden Fence

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

If your cat is stuck in some furniture or a box or whatever, get your cat unstuck.

You don’t need to pause for a photo op, and your cat doesn’t understand why you’re not helping. You’re supposed to be their guardian.

You can laugh about the goofy situation your cat is in later, but for now, help them out.

6. Annoyed Cat

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(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Intentionally annoying your cat to get an angry reaction isn’t much better than scaring your cat.

Again, your cat is supposed to know that they can trust you completely, and if you’re annoying them on purpose for your own entertainment, you’re breaking their trust.

And no one really wants to see an annoyed cat, anyway.

7. Fat Cat

Fat Cat

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Feline obesity is a huge health problem for cats, and if your cat is fat, it’s your fault. Barring some medical condition, you need to be the one to control your cat’s weight.

Posting a picture of your fat kitty on social media and laughing about it isn’t cool. Get your cat on a diet, and make sure they live a full, happy, healthy life.

If your cat is on a weight loss journey and you want to document it on social media to show how proud you are of their progress or call attention to feline obesity, then that might be an exception to this rule. Just be responsible.

8. Sad Bath Time

Cats are often unhappy getting a bath. This white long-hair cat waits to be finished with her bath, sitting in the white tub with a green tile-background.

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Some cats love the water, and that’s great. But seeing a miserable, wet cat isn’t my idea of a good time.

Most of the time, cats don’t need baths and take care of their own grooming, anyway. But there are circumstances where cats might need a bath.

That said, we don’t need to see how sad your kitty is about it. Just get to the bathing.

9. Pet Store Cat

Kittens and cats for sale

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

If you’re cat shopping, don’t go to a pet store and post pictures. They may be cute, but pet stores usually get their cats from mills with horrible conditions that crank out pets just for profits.

Take pictures of shelter cats, instead. Then you can help your friends find cats in need of forever homes, too.

Some places have made it so that pet stores can only sell adoptable animals instead of those obtained from mills or backyard breeders. If you live in one of those areas, this rule may be another that doesn’t apply to you.

By all means, post adoptable pets online and help them find homes!

10. Cats With Yarn, String, Or Dangerous Toys

Grey and white kitten playing with ball a of wool with lose thread. Kitten lying on a carpet holding the small ball of blue wool between front paws, with claws extended. Focus on the kittens head and wool.

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

There’s an old stereotype about cats and yarn, but cats can actually eat yarn, and it can really hurt them. The same can be said of string or dangerous toys that kitties can swallow.

Stick to some safe toys that your cat can enjoy. Everyone loves to see cats playing and having a good time, but not if they’re in danger.

What other cat photos are you sick of seeing on social media? Let us know in the comments below!

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The post 10 Photos Of Your Cat That We DON’T Want To See appeared first on CatTime.

10 Of The Greatest Songs About Cats Ever Made

kittens singing songs about cats into microphones

(Picture Credit: Getty Images)

Cats have become a staple of internet culture. It seems like you can’t turn on a screen without seeing a cat meme or viral cat video these days.

I know it’s hard to think of a time before the internet, but there was. And it may surprise some youngsters to know that cats were just as pervasive in pop culture way back then as they are now.

Here are some of the greatest older–and newer–songs about our favorite furry feline family members.

1. ‘Cool For Cats’ By Squeeze

The second single off of Squeeze’s album of the same name, “Cool For Cats,” is a boastful drunken pub crawl of a song.

You know that silly but confident look your cat gives you after chewing on a little too much catnip? This song captures that swagger perfectly.

2. ‘The Lovecats’ By The Cure

Word has it that The Cure’s lead singer, Robert Smith, was very taken by Patrick White’s novel The Vivsector, which inspired him to write this song.

In the book, the protagonist, Hurtle, is horrified when he discovers his lover’s husband drowned a bag of stray cats. Smith must have been appalled as well, because his lyrics are about hanging out with a lover as if they were stray cats, laying around and wandering about the streets.

3. ‘The Lion Sleeps Tonight’ By The Tokens

Okay, so this song may be about a large wildcat, but what cat hasn’t thought of themselves as a ferocious wild cat whose jungle is your laundry room?

If you’ve got a little house lion at home, try singing them this song. Maybe it’ll soothe your savage beast.

4. ‘Nashville Cats’ By The Lovin’ Spoonful

Have you noticed a trend with these songs? A lot of them have an easy, breezy vibe about them. Most cats are perfectly content being lazy and occasionally goofy.

The Lovin’ Spoonful‘s “Nashville Cats” captures this laid back kitty mentality perfectly.

5. ‘Alley Cats’ By Hot Chip

The lyrics may seem nonsensical at points, but we know there is deeper meaning behind them–just like the deeper meaning behind why your cat decided that your vintage armoire was a perfectly fine piece of furniture to use as a scratching post.

If you’re still upset about that, this song will send chill vibes to cool you down.

6. ‘Phenomenal Cat’ By The Kinks

There’s an underlying double meaning to who The Kinks are talking about when they say “Fat Cat,” but for simplicity’s sake, let’s pretend it’s about your favorite feline friend and the sweet life you provide to them.

After all, your kitty is certainly phenomenal!

7. ‘Cat On Tin Roof’ By Blonde Redhead

More of a sultry tune, Blonde Redhead‘s sometimes indecipherable lyrics almost sound like a cat.

Seriously, how does that bizarre, high-pitched mewing noise come out of your kitty? Maybe they’re secretly a member of this band.

8. ‘Pads, Paws & Claws’ By Elvis Costello

As most Elvis Costello songs go, this song is about a relationship gone sour.

Here, Costello sings of a drunkard and his relationship with a flirty woman and how she “pads, paws, and claws.”

Costello, we know exactly what you are talking about. We’ve all woken up more than once with our kitties pawing into our chests, begging for breakfast.

9. ‘What’s New Pussycat’ By Tom Jones

No cat song compilation would be complete without Tom Jones‘s “What’s New Pussycat.”

This cheeky ditty was the titular song of a film with the same name starring Peter Sellers. While there is no proof that Jones wrote this about an actual cat, we can pretend he did.

10. ‘When He Calls Me Kitten’ By The Kelly Deal 6000

You gotta love the kittens sounds Kelley makes on the guitar. Kitten is a term of endearment in the song, and it’s easy to see why–because our cats are so dear to us!

In the song, he calls to her just to know she is there, and it’s easy for any cat lover to relate. When your cat falls asleep in some corner of the house, and you can’t find them, don’t you just call out to your kitten sometimes so you can see them, and know they’re there?

What’s your favorite kitty-centric song? Are there any others great cat songs that belong on the list? Let us know in the comments below!

Related Articles:

50 Famous Quotes About Cats

The 5 Best Cats Featured In Walt Disney Cartoons And Movies

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Science Says This Is The Real Reason Why Cats Eat Grass

Your cat starts eating grass, and you know what happens next. If you’re lucky, your considerate kitty will aim for the laminate. For most of us, however, we end up grabbing the rubber gloves to clean cat puke off the carpet. It’s common knowledge that cats (and dogs, too) eat grass to make themselves throw up. It supposedly settles their stomachs when they’re feeling sick. But what if that whole “eating grass to feel better thing” wasn’t completely true? Researchers with University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine recently completed a study that might change everything you thought you knew about why cats eat grass.

Researchers Want to Know

The topic of why cats eat grass was recently brought up at an annual meeting of the International Society for Applied Ethology. To answer the question, cat experts turned to the UC Davis study that involved 1,021 cat owners. Each cat owner committed to observing their felines’ behavior for at least 3 hours every day. All of the participating cats had access to pet-safe grass and allowed opportunities for snacking.

The first thing researchers found was that eating grass is a common behavior for cats of all ages. Only 11% of the participating cats refrained from eating grass.

Of that vast majority that at least occasionally ate grass, only about a quarter of the cats vomited afterward. This is the first statistic that starts putting holes in our previous theory that cats eat grass because they want to make themselves throw up. If that were true, why weren’t there more soiled carpets?

Digging Deeper

To take it a step further, observers took note of whether or not their cats showed symptoms of feeling unwell before they started biting at the grass. This was a bit tricky, because as most cat owners know, cats are particularly good at hiding their pain. They usually face their ailments with stoic indifference, but there are subtle ways to tell if a cat isn’t feeling well. Increased thirst, decreased appetite, excessive vocalizations, and behavioral changes are all examples. 

Out of the grass-eating cats, 91% showed no signs of feeling sick before they started eating grass. One or two cats caught eating grass for no apparent reason could have been a coincidence, but with an overwhelming majority showing no signs of illness, we’re forced to change what we thought we always knew. 

A Few New Theories

With their evidence in hand, researchers started looking at other reasons why cats choose to eat grass. One theory is that the behavior is based on instinct. Early on, before cats were our pampered pets, they practiced purging as a way of protecting themselves from parasites. Intestinal parasites were a common threat that came from eating infected rodents. The only way cats knew to get rid of the parasites was to throw them up along with the rest of their meals. Eating grass was one way to make that happen.

Thanks to modern veterinary care, cats haven’t had to worry about parasites for a long time. Even still, inducing regurgitation could be an instinct left over after all these years. The more likely theory, however, is a lot simpler. 

Cat eat grass

Researchers have come to the conclusion that, in most cases, cats eat grass not because they feel sick, but because they simply enjoy it. They probably consider grass to be a tasty treat that is easily accessible. There’s a good chance they know they might throw it back up, but with only a quarter of grass-eating incidents resulting in regurgitation, vomiting is more of a potential byproduct than a desired outcome.

Does This Change Anything?

Science can tell us a lot about our feline best friends. This study suggests that cats thoroughly enjoy eating grass, and as long as it’s a non-toxic plant, there’s nothing for you to worry about. It would be useful to research cat-safe greenery and even plant some for your felines to enjoy. 

And the next time your cat eats grass, there’s no reason to assume she’s sick. Monitor her for symptoms just in case, but there’s a good chance she’s simply helping herself to a satisfying snack.

REMEMBER: ADOPT, DON’T SHOP; FOSTERING SAVES LIVES & SPAY AND NEUTER!

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9 Reasons We Love the Russian Blue Cat

The post 9 Reasons We Love the Russian Blue Cat by Erika Sorocco appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

If a cat with mystique is what you seek, then you truly can’t look further than the Russian Blue cat. Shrouded in a cloud of mystery, the blue-hued beauty has a history based solely on legend — with no proven facts regarding her origins.

1. How the Russian Blue came to be

A Russian Blue cat.

A Russian Blue cat. Photography by Tetsu Yamazaki.

In one bit of Russian Blue lore, it’s said that the breed is a descendant of the royal felines kept by the Russian tsars. Contrary to that fun splash of folklore is the rumor that the Russian Blue cat actually originated on Northern Russia’s Archangel Isles (giving the breed the nickname Archangel Cat), where the breed was picked up by sailors in the 1800s and brought to Europe. And according to folklore, the Russian Blue is said to bring not just good luck but healing abilities, too!

2. Give us a smile

The Russian Blue has a naturally upturned mouth that has garnered her comparisons to Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.

3. Are Russian Blue cats truly blue or gray?

Oh, she’s blue all right — with a silver cast that electrifies this feline! A diluted version of the gene responsible for black hair is what produces the silvery coat seen on the Russian Blue. But that’s not the only thing that keeps her in a class of her own: Her bright green eyes, silky-to-the-touch double-layered coat and lithe body make her one of a kind.

4. Fastidious feline

Though not technically a high-maintenance housemate, the Russian Blue is very particular about hygiene in the bathroom, so keep her litter box spotless!

5. Russian Blue cats are typically quiet

A Russian Blue cat is shy and reserved until she thinks you’re worthy of her presence. Though gentle and quiet in nature, the Russian Blue has a soft spot for high places, where she can people watch for hours until she gets a feel for your personality. Guests might be ignored, but family members receive all of the loyalty. And if you’re her No. 1, she’ll shadow you like crazy and even hitch a ride on your shoulder from time to time. Even better? She’s an independent kitty, so she doesn’t mind hanging at home by herself, making her the perfect breed for working singles!

6. Love is all around

A Russian Blue cat.

A Russian Blue cat. Photography by Tetsu Yamazaki.

If you’re her favorite human, be ready for nonstop love, because she is all about you, you and more you. Feeling out of sorts? She’ll stick by your side, working her healing abilities on you until you’re up and at ’em again! Prepping dinner? She’ll chill by your side, acting as taste tester. Binge-watching a new TV show? She’ll curl up by your side — just have a comb handy, as she loves being brushed while watching the tube!

7. The Russian Blue cat moves gracefully

The Russian Blue moves with the same type of lithe grace as a Russian ballerina, so you can expect to see her dancing through the hallways of your humble abode whenever she feels the urge — day or night.

8. Keep on schedule

She may be flexible when it comes to movement, but the Russian Blue is a creature of habit when we’re talking daily activities. Meals should arrive on time, and her environment should remain both quiet and stable. Think of her as a furry alarm clock.

9. Russian Blue cats aren’t hypoallergenic

While the Russian Blue sheds less frequently and produces a lower level of the Fel d 1 protein than other breeds, she still produces dander, making her a kitty who won’t solve your allergy issues.

Bonus Fact:

The Russian Blue was once nicknamed the “Doberman Pinscher of Cats” by a judge at a cat show due to the breed’s long, muscular body, which manages to be both elegant and athletic.

Thumbnail: Photography by Tetsu Yamazaki.

Erika Sorocco has been writing about cats for 12 years. She currently shares her home with two finicky felines (Minky and Gypsy), one crazy pup (Jake) and not enough closet space. Find her online chatting about beauty, books, fashion and fur babies at cateyesandskinnyjeans.com

Read more about cat breeds on Catster.com:

Editor’s note: Have you seen the new Catster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting area of your vet’s office? Click here to subscribe to Catster and get the bimonthly magazine delivered to your home. 

The post 9 Reasons We Love the Russian Blue Cat by Erika Sorocco appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Meow 3D Cat Planter

The post Meow 3D Cat Planter by Melissa Kauffman appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Lori Wendin, our art director, sent me the link to this planter, saying — run this! Of course, I loved it, too and reached out to co-creator Angel Napoleon to find out the inspiration behind this great product.

About five years ago, Angel and her partner Brent Napoleon were working at a 3D printing company, working on other peoples’ ideas and products. “After a change of heart and direction,” Angel says, “We decided to take matters into our own hands and start our own business developing a line of products that we could be proud of. After endless sketches, prototypes and ideas we developed a functional, super cute cat planter, and we went into production.”

Since Angel can paint as well as 3D design, they were able to make it look just like the person’s cat. “It’s a unique gift and can last a lifetime with the proper care,” she says. “We’re proud to be creating functional, practical art that people can enjoy. It makes them smile, us smile, and we can both be happy — there’s not much better than that!”

All products are made to order from the Meow 3D studio in Montclair, New Jersey. Angel sculpts the model using 3D software. They 3D print the final version using responsibly sourced PLA material (corn based). Next, they hand-paint and embellish the model to give it realistic characteristics of the customer’s dog or cat. (They also offer human portraits.)

“We’re the originators of this particular style,” says Angel, explaining that they started three years ago. “We’ve gotten so much positive feedback with our work, and we continue to improve based on the feedback we receive.” Love this purrific planter? Check out Meow 3D’s shop at etsy.com/shop/Meow3DStore; the website at meow3d.com; on social @Meow3d_; or at Pinterest at pinterest.com/Meow3Dstudio/pins/.

The post Meow 3D Cat Planter by Melissa Kauffman appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Willow – Ragdoll of the Week

Willow, the Pride, and the Pack

By Mike and Bonnie
Bellevue, Nebraska – USA

Willow is our youngest of three female ragdolls from Paws of the Heartland in northernmost Nebraska, USA. They are roughly a year and a half apart, beginning five years ago.

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My wife and I think Willow is particularly special because she filled a huge void in our hearts after losing our twenty-eight year old Amazon parrot Cecil to cancer in July, 2018. Willow shares our home with pride-mates Lilly and Ivy and much older pack-mates Katie and Cooper (Norwich and West Highland terriers). Our animal friends are a big part of our daily life. We don’t think of our animals as “pets”, they are “family”.

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Willow is the star of fast-food drive-throughs, she typically stretches out on the car dash when we pull up to a service window. Typically, distracted or disinterested workers are giddy with surprise and joy when they see us, they put their hands to their face and say OMG, it’s a CAT! We are known as the cat people at the coffee drive up, everyone smiles as Willow sticks her head out of the driver’s window. When we’re moving around the house preparing for a car ride, Willow lets us know she wants to go too, quite unusual based on our experience over a lifetime with our cats past and present. She waits patiently near the door and agrees to manipulations as her harness is fitted around her.

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One pleasant day, we tried taking her for a walk with her harness and leash at a local cemetery, it is less traveled by people and vehicles. Unfortunately, a nearby worker on lunch break started up his riding mower and startled Willow so bad she flew up and out like a yo-yo on a string and somehow wiggled out of her harness and bolted for the cover of the woods. Thankfully, we found her hiding in tall grass and gathered her to safety. We’ve become more careful about loud noises; we can’t imagine losing her to such circumstances.

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Willow enjoys hiding in the highest places she can barely reach, she eventually meows to let us know she wants assistance. We are suckers to help even when she could manage without a rescue. She has us well trained to play fetch too. Her favorite cat toy is simply a wadded-up food wrapper, golf ball sized. She plays cat hockey all over the house, upstairs, downstairs, the more difficult the space, the better. She takes particular pleasure in bringing wrapper balls when we’re sleeping, she makes purring yodeling sounds until we wake up to play fetch. Other favorite play things are cardboard boxes of any size or paper sacks from shopping. We are careful to cut any string handles in half to avoid entanglement danger. On the subject of danger, be careful not to have toxic-to-cats plants around the house!

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Willow has finally grown large enough to hold her own against occasional domination attempts by the matriarch Lilly. Ivy just wants to have fun; she is the largest and most docile. It feels like Willow will keep her kitten-like enthusiasm longer than usual. We have endless photos of every member of the pack but the latest focus is Willow, she seems to be an extra comfortable and willing subject.

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Carol Stevens provides healthy and quality ragdoll kittens; she runs her business with long-standing care and concern for customer satisfaction. She insists on proof of spay or neuter after the sale, following a proper minimum time. She includes a registered chip in each animal and associated paperwork. Here’s her website to view availability and terms. Cost is fair and reasonable and she goes out of her way to arrange delivery.

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The photos included can’t compete with the joy we receive from the subjects.
Ragdolls rule, terriers care, parrots party!

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Do you have a Ragdoll Kitten or Cat?  Consider submitting your kitty!  Ragdoll of the Week submission guidelines

Read more Ragdoll of the Week submissions.

The post Willow – Ragdoll of the Week appeared first on Floppycats.

Big Changes for Small Spaces

The post Big Changes for Small Spaces by Kate Benjamin appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Living in a small space with a cat can be a big design challenge. How do you give your cat everything she needs to live a happy, healthy life while also finding room for all your things? Sure, you’d love to buy one of those giant cat trees, but where will it go? And how about the litter box? A small home can make you feel like your cat’s things have taken over.

There are lots of creative ways to maximize a small space in order to design an enriched environment for your cat while keeping your style — and your sanity — intact. Integrate climbing, scratching, playing, resting and even litter for your cat with your own living needs. Here’s how.

Go vertical

The most important thing to do when living in a small space with a cat is maximize the vertical space for climbing. You can essentially create a second floor for your cat by building a walkway that she can easily access and giving her lounging and perching spots overhead.

Look around your home for existing surfaces that can be converted for climbing — tops of bookshelves, kitchen cabinets, nooks, windowsills or ledges that you can easily designate for cat use. Clear off the clutter and add apiece of carpet or a yoga mat so kitty won’t slip when she jumps on and off. Now, rearrange the furniture as needed to make it easy for your cat to get up and down to her newfound territory.

Cat Climber

The Cat Climber from Smart Cat is designed to hang on any standard door.

PurrShelf cat furniture

The PurrShelf integrates climbing and scratching with bookshelf storage.

You don’t have to add a big, cumbersome cat tree that takes up a lot of room. Look for cat climbers that hang over the back of a door. These are great for maximizing vertical terrain without sacrificing floor space.

Take advantage of unused space

In a small home you have to make the most of every square inch. Look for small spaces that are otherwise unusable for you, like under a table or a chair, where you can create something for your cat. That’s the perfect place for a scratcher or a comfy bed.

Hauspanther Scratch Pole

The Hauspanther Scratch Pole adjusts to fit under any table or desk, creating a sturdy scratching surface that’s out of the way.

cat scratching post

cat scratching post

Make an easy DIY scratcher by wrapping a table leg with sisal rope.

Make it multi-function

Another great way to maximize space is to find items that serve multiple purposes. Look for furniture that integrates cat functions with human functions, like a litter box hider that doubles as a bench or a cat hideaway that’s also aside table. How about a climbing shelf that has space for your book collection? Multi-functional designs bring together the best of both worlds.

Cat Washroom

The Cat Washroom is a litterbox hider that doubles as bathroom storage.

Igloo cat bed

The Igloo Cat Bed can also be used as a side table.

Storage secret

Small homes are often short on storage space so you may not have a place to keep the cat carrier when it’s not in use. Instead, keep the carrier out and let your cat use it as a bed. This way the carrier will be a familiar place when it is time to go out plus you won’t have to find a spot to stash it.

Sleepypod carrier

The Sleepypod carrier is designed to be used as a comfy bed between uses. Simply remove the top and let kitty use the base for lounging.

 

Cat Climber – pioneerpet.com

Hauspanther Scratch Pole – primetimepetz.com

Cat Washroom – merryproducts.com

Igloo Cat Bed – therefinedfeline.com

Sleepypod carrier – sleepypod.com

PurrShelf – purrproducts.com

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Stella Talks College

The post Stella Talks College by Stella the Cat appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

College season is upon us, and I made the mistake of asking my cat, Stella, if she wanted to go. Yes, she wanted to go.

Stella, have you ever wanted to go to college?

No, but now that you mention it, yes. Can we tour the dining halls now?

Sorry, Stella, I was just making conversation. Cats don’t really go to college.

Oh, come on! I can change channels and preheat the oven. I belong in college — and the assorted cafeteria and dining establishments.

I can say for certain that college is not the place for you. For one, how would you even get in?

Easy. Just send ‘em 63 bucks and a picture of me sitting on a paddle. Done. Captain of the rowing team. A full ride to an elite school of my choosing.

That’s not how you get into college.

Sure it is. I saw it on BuzzFeed.

And I worry you’d nap during the lectures.

Everybody naps during the lectures. It’s long known that the human body can’t survive Intro to Philosophy without a good 30 minutes of flat-out unconsciousness. Cats require the full hour.

So how will you learn anything?

I imagine the information will just soak into me. Remember when I learned economics napping through The Price is Right?

I don’t think you learned economics.

Sure I did. Butter is $19.37 a pound.

I also worry you’ll want to join a fraternity.

I certainly hope so. I didn’t watch National Lampoon’s Animal House 17 times for nothing. Nobody is more qualified to take
down Dean Wormer than me.

You watched Animal House 17 times?

It’s on Hulu. We now subscribe to Hulu, by the way.

I also think you’ll quickly lose interest and drop out.

Of course I’ll drop out! All geniuses drop out when they get funded.

You mean you’ll start a company?

Sure. Some social-media thing where people send me chicken. Or I’ll invent a car that runs on … vacuum cleaners. Good for the environment and gets rid of all the vacuum cleaners. I’ll be the first cat ever on Fast Money. Just spitballing, here.

Those are terrible ideas.

How about a blood test you can do in the comfort of a 7-Eleven?

Didn’t Elizabeth Holmes try that with Theranos?

She couldn’t figure out the technology.

And you can?

Come on — it’s a blood test. Should I start wearing a turtleneck now and establish a mythology?

No.

You’re right, my neck is too pretty. What if I wear a hoodie? Picture me on the cover of Wired. “The billionaire tech cat who has all your chicken.”

I can’t picture that.

Vogue, then. “How this monocle-wearing feline keeps Silicon Valley purring.”

That’s equally terrible.

You try writing a headline that doesn’t sound stupid.

I don’t think you’re cut out to be a tech genius, Stella.

Watch your tone. I still need someone to help shovel all the venture capital into the back bedroom.

Why don’t you go soak in some more economics on the couch?

Is it 10 a.m. already?! Let’s put a pin in this conversation until after the Showcase Showdown.

Have a nice nap, Stella.

I hope I dream about the Stanford cafeteria. Cafeteria dreams
are the best.

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A Fabulous Feline Artist

The post A Fabulous Feline Artist by Ramonamarek appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

He favors a palette of yellow with purple, pink and orange for flowers. Nature is his muse and inspires him to paint several times a year, most often during seasonal changes. His technique is streaks, dabs and splotches applied with his right paw. Meet Quint Cole, acrylic artist.

Born in 2012, Quint was the last of his litter left after adoption day at the pet store. Disguised as a need for buying litter, serendipity brought Carole and Catdad Steve, of Colehaus Cats blog, to the pet store where they saw the orange-and-white kitten. Quint and a black kitten, Olivia, were adopted into the Colehaus Cats family.

In his teenage phase, Quint began to show his personality, Carole says. He expressed his artistic talent with toothpaste-speck medium stylistically dabbed and smeared on the bathroom mirror. He experimented with a more texturized medium — damp cat litter — creating masterpieces in his signature style, first on the wall, then the closet doors in the cat room.

“We knew Quint was communicating that he needed something,” Carole says. “We did our best to listen. We moved the litter box and tried different litters, but he still decorated the doors. That’s when we wondered if he was intentionally applying artistic designs, so we redirected his natural talent toward a medium with less ‘eww.’”

Quint took to it. “We set up his cardboard ‘studio’ across the bathroom countertop,” Carole says. “We use petsafe, water-based acrylic paints and a 4- by 4-inch canvas because it is sturdy and easy for him to grip. He likes only a few seasonal colors at one time and insists yellow is one of the colors.”

Quint brings a stripy ball or mousie for company while he paints. He doesn’t lick the paint on his paws and doesn’t mind getting cleaned up. Quint’s paintings aren’t haphazard paw prints traipsed across paper. “Quint paints with focused intention,” Steve explains. “He dabs his paw in the paint, presses it, either a hard paw press or soft delicate press onto the paper, curls his paw up to his chest and looks at what he’s working on, directly and at the reflection in the mirror. It looks like he thinks about color, placement and composition.”

Quint doesn’t paint every day. He signals he’s ready by leaving toothpaste memos on the mirror. “Quint is sensitive to seasonal changes,” Carole says. “He sits in a window and watches clouds, birds and blowing leaves. He likes to put on his harness for a nature walk in the garden to sniff his favorite flowers, the large pink rhododendron and petunias, for inspiration,” Carole says.

Quint painting

Quint the artist seems to be inspired by nature, and he prefers a simple palette of seasonal colors — especially yellow.

Quint has an extensive portfolio and has sold and donated over 300 paintings. A benevolent artist, proceeds from art sales benefit cats in need of food, shelter and medical care. Quint’s artist story, samples of his work and his art shop can be found at colehauscats.com. Each painting is matted, signed and numbered; comes with Quint’s card, approved by one of the Colehaus Cats; and placed in a plastic sleeve.

“I believe each cat has something to teach us,” Carole says. “Quint taught me all I know about art, organizational tips and the importance of garden walks.”

The post A Fabulous Feline Artist by Ramonamarek appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Cat Spraying — Why Does It Happen and What Can You Do?

The post Cat Spraying — Why Does It Happen and What Can You Do? by Marilyn Krieger appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Cats don’t need high-tech devices to communicate. In addition to body language, vocalizing, scratching objects and rubbing, they use urine to broadcast their intentions and emotions. Cat spraying, which is one form of urine marking, is not hugely popular with people, especially when done indoors.

It can be difficult to tell the difference between cat peeing and cat spraying because some cats stand instead of squat while urinating. The smell and the amount of urine indicate whether it’s urinating or a cat spraying behavior. Spray is highly pungent because it contains pheromones. This unpleasant smell sometimes is the only indicator that cats have sprayed in the house. One positive note is that less urine is deposited when cats spray than when they urinate.

Kitties are sometimes caught in the act — backing up to a vertical surface, treading with the front paws, and quickly twitching their tails while spraying. Simultaneously, they may close their eyes.

The reasons behind cat spraying

Spraying is a form of communication: broadcasting availability and emotions of the spraying cat

Cat spraying is a form of communication: broadcasting availability and emotions of the spraying cat. Photography by DavidTB / Shutterstock.

Urine is a powerful communication tool — cats can tell a great deal about each other from it including age, sex, status and sexual availability. Although adult cats of both genders, whole as well as fixed, might spray under specific circumstances, intact ones are most often guilty of the smelly behavior.

Whole males, as a rule, are prone to cat spraying behaviors. Pheromones, released into the urine, advertise they’re ready, willing and on the alert for girlfriends. Additionally, cat spraying broadcasts clear messages to other male cats to stay away. Intact female cats spray, too — the chemicals in their urine indicate where they are in their cycle.

Spray from intact cats is more pungent than from those who are fixed. The unpleasant smell is easier to detect from a distance — important for advertising for a special friend.


What causes cat spraying in spayed and neutered cats

Although spayed and neutered cats aren’t looking to connect with members of the opposite sex, they have other reasons to engage in cat spraying including …

1. Marking boundaries

Cat spraying is the feline version of drawing lines in the sand and putting up “no trespassing” signs. Kitties are territorial — the far-reaching effects of the pungent urine lets other animals in the hood know the extent of their stomping grounds.

2. Reacting to neighborhood cats

Inside cats sometimes spray around doors and windows when they see or smell unfamiliar cats hanging out around their homes. They spray to mark territories and because they can’t reach the intruders to chase them away or engage with them. Often, the unwelcome visitors leave their own calling cards, which the resident felines smell.

3. Recognizing their own scents

Cats sometimes will spray inside their territories so they can smell and recognize their own scents.

4. New objects and furniture

Some cats will spray new furniture or objects that are brought into their homes.

5. Stress

Insecurities and stress can trigger cat spraying. Some cats are more sensitive than others, responding by marking to situations such as other cats, household changes, owners traveling, illness, new household pets and even schedule changes.

6. Mingling scents

Some cats will spray their favorite people’s belongings in an effort to mix scents together and create a bond. Another reason is for security. Stressed, fearful cats will sometimes spray objects that smell like their owners, helping the cats feel a little more secure.

7. Not adjusting to change

Some cats do not adjust well to household changes, including problems between the humans residents, a new baby, schedule changes, moving and remodeling.

8. Conflict resolution

Conflicts in multicat households can cause cat spraying. Stressed, anxious and threatened felines will spray in order to communicate status and territorial boundaries. In theory, the smelly behavior might keep cats from fighting. Cats who engage in hostilities often are scratched and bitten. Settling wars through cat spraying is much safer.


How to stop cat spraying

The following tips and suggestions help stop cat spraying, and they also help stop the behavior before it begins:

1. Don’t punish cats

Never punish cats when they spray. Don’t yell, rub noses in the urine, or hit them. Those responses will cause kitties to feel more stressed and escalate behaviors. Sadly, it also breaks the bonds between them and the punisher. Kitties aren’t being bad — they have good reasons for marking. Instead, identify the causes for the behavior and address them.

2. Use an enzyme cleaner

Thoroughly clean marked areas with an effective enzyme cleaner. It might take a couple of applications until the smell is eliminated.

3. Change mental connections

Change your cat’s association with the targeted areas after the areas have been cleaned with the enzyme cleaner. Do activities she enjoys such as playing, petting and clicker training on the areas. Placing toys and scratchers near them will also change how she relates to the sprayed spots.

4. Use synthetic pheromones

Using synthetic pheromones around the marked areas can help calm and relax your cat.

5. Close doors

Temporarily keep your kitty out of the rooms that are being sprayed.

6. Interaction

If your cat is spraying a family member’s belongings, encourage the person to feed, play, and interact with the kitty every day.

7. Address inter-cat issues

Increase the resources to reduce the competition in multi-cat households. Provide more vertical territory, hiding places, scratchers, and toys throughout your home. You might need to add feeding stations, placing them a distance from each other. Make sure there are enough clean litter boxes — one per cat, plus one, and place them in different areas of your home. Sometimes separating warring cats from each other and gradually reintroducing them will stop the squabbling and cat spraying behaviors.

8. Discourage neighborhood cats

Keep neighborhood cats off your property by placing safe deterrents around the outside perimeter of your home. Temporarily block your kitty’s view of the unwelcome visitors by covering windows. After the intruders stop visiting, uncover the windows.

9. Spay and neuter

Although all adult cats can spray, the chances of their marking are greatly reduced by spaying and neutering. In addition to eliminating the reasons to mark, spaying and neutering also helps curtail hostilities.

10. Daily interaction

Help your cat feel more secure and less anxious by doing activities she enjoys every day, such as playing, treasure hunts and clicker training.

11. Vet check

Before assuming your cat has a behavior challenge, have a veterinarian examine her in order to rule out any possible medical problems that could be causing her to spray.

12. Gradual introductions

Newly adopted kitties need to be separated from your resident felines and gradually introduced. It might take a month or longer to introduce them to each other with a minimum of stress.

Some final thoughts on cat spraying

Although cat spraying can happen with any cat, it is a behavior that intact cats are more likely to engage in than those who are fixed. Once the reasons for the smelly behavior are identified, you should be able to stop it or at least reduce the occurrences by addressing the causes and modifying the environment.

Can’t tell if your cat sprayed and not sure how to clean it up? Follow these tips >>

Thumbnail: Photography © debibishop | iStock / Getty Images Plus.

This piece was originally published in 2015.

Read more about weird cat behaviors on Catster.com:

About the author

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Got a cat behavior question for Marilyn? Ask our behaviorist in the comments below and you might be featured in an upcoming column. If you suspect a behavioral problem, always rule out any possible medical issues that may be causing the behavior by first having your cat examined by a veterinarian.

Marilyn, a certified cat behavior consultant, owner of The Cat Coach, LLC, solves cat behavior problems nationally and internationally through on site, Skype and phone consultations. She uses positive reinforcement, including environmental changes, management, clicker training and other behavior modification techniques.

She is also an award winning author. Her book Naughty No More! focuses on solving cat behavior problems through clicker training and other positive reinforcement methods. Marilyn is big on education — she feels it is important for cat parents to know the reasons behind their cat’s behaviors. She is a frequent guest on television and radio, answering cat behavior questions and helping people understand their cats.

The post Cat Spraying — Why Does It Happen and What Can You Do? by Marilyn Krieger appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

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